Wednesday, July 31, 2013

WWW.AUSCULTATIONS.NET

After 16 fantastic months in existence, it's about time that Auscultations started shedding it's awkward juvenile trappings and start acting like a real adult blog (not that kind of adult blog...).

With that in mind, I can happily announce that Auscultations is no longer auscultations.blogspot.com, but will henceforth be found at www.auscultations.net!


Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Notations 8: Ladue and Tómasdóttir

Here is the eighth installment of Notations! Inspired by Cage's 1969 bookNotations is a collection of graphic scores, hand drawn music calligraphy, computer code, compositional sketches, text scores, and other innovative forms of musical notation.

Every Monday we'll showcase notation by two different composers, primarily focusing on those local to Los Angeles. This week's composers are Bob LaDue and Berglind Tómasdóttir.

All images used with permission, and copyright is retained by each image's respective creator. Click on the images to see a larger view.

Line 1 from Chekere by Bob LaDue

Bob LaDue is a musician from Oakland, CA that makes Chekere instruments. He performs under the name of Denny Denny Breakfast.


I'm An Island by Berglind Tómasdóttir

Berglind Tómasdóttir is a flutist and interdisciplinary artist whose work has been featured at Reykjavík Arts Festival, MSPS New Music Festival in Shreveport, Louisiana, REDCAT in Los Angeles, CMMAS in Morelia, Mexico and the Bang on a Can Marathon in San Francisco. She holds degrees in flute playing from Reykjavik College of Music and the Royal Danish Music Conservatory in Copenhagen. Currently she is pursuing her DMA in contemporary music performance at the University of California, San Diego.

More info at berglindtomasdottir.com

Friday, July 26, 2013

Timur and the Dime Museum @ Joe's Pub tomorrow!


If you're in New York, come to Joe's Pub this Saturday, 7/27 to experience Timur and the Dime Museum and Mira Stroika!

Use the code "JPTIXA2" to receive $5 off your ticket price when you order your ticket online!

We had an amazing time playing at the Downstreet Arts Festival in North Adams, and are excited to bring our music back to New York!

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

TDM on the East Coast!

Timur and the Dime Museum will be playing several shows on the East Coast this weekend! If you're in town, come down and hear some exciting new music. We'll have copies of our new album, X-Ray Sunsets, as well! BTW, you can hear X-Ray Sunsets on Bandcamp now!

On July 25, we'll be playing at the Downstreet Art Festival, in North Adams, MA.

Following that performance, we'll be travelling to New York to play at the legendary Joe's Pub on July 27! We are especially excited to be returning to New York, after having an amazing time being part of Beth Morrison's Prototype Festival in January. Buy tickets for this show ahead of time!

I really hope we'll see you at one of these shows!








Monday, July 22, 2013

Notations 7: Byrnes and Stone

Here is the seventh installment of Notations! Inspired by Cage's 1969 bookNotations is a collection of graphic scores, hand drawn music calligraphy, computer code, compositional sketches, text scores, and other innovative forms of musical notation.

Every Monday we'll showcase notation by two different composers, primarily focusing on those local to Los Angeles. This week's composers are Ted Byrnes and Carl Stone.

All images used with permission, and copyright is retained by each image's respective creator. Click on the images to see a larger view.

from 5x5 by Ted Byrnes


Ted Byrnes is a drummer/percussionist living in Los Angeles. An alumni of the Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA, he comes from a jazz background and has since made his home in the worlds of free improvisation, new music, electro-acoustic music, and noise. Ted primarily works in ad hoc improvisational settings, but has standing improvisational groups including: a trio with Ulrich Krieger and Wyatt Penn Keusch, a duo with Nicholas Deyoe, a duo with Michael Foster, a duo with Casey Anderson, a trio with Jorge Martin and Anna Homler, among others.

More info at tedbyrnesdrums.com

Djerassi Loops by Carl Stone

Carl Stone is one of the pioneers of live computer music, and has been hailed by the Village Voice as "the king of sampling." and "one of the best composers living in (the USA) today." He has used computers in live performance since 1986. Stone was born in Los Angeles and now divides his time between San Francisco and Japan. He studied composition at the California Institute of the Arts with Morton Subotnick and James Tenney and has composed electro-acoustic music almost exclusively since 1972. His works have been performed in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia, Australia, South America and the Near East. In addition to his schedule of performance, composition and touring, he is on the faculty of the Media Department at Chukyo University in Japan.

More info at sukothai.com

Monday, July 15, 2013

Notations 6: Digennario and Carey

here is the sixth installment of Notations! Inspired by Cage's 1969 bookNotations is a collection of graphic scores, hand drawn music calligraphy, computer code, compositional sketches, text scores, and other innovative forms of musical notation.

Every Monday we'll showcase notation by two different composers, primarily focusing on those local to Los Angeles. This week's composers are Antony Digennario and Archie Carey.

All images used with permission, and copyright is retained by each image's respective creator. Click on the images to see a larger view.

fuckin weird ass piece by Antony Digennario

Antony Digennario is a composer and multi-instrumentalist, currently roaming the hills on the outskirts of the Los Angeles area. His songs and compositions draw from experiences and influences ranging from early Americana to techniques culled from the 20th/21st century experimental tradition. To date, he has released several albums as a soloist, leader and sideman as well as many scores for independent film.

More info at doomcountry.org

delusional harmony by Archie Carey

Archie Carey is a multi-instrumental performer/composer living in Southern California. Archie is interested in writing music that is not only meditative for the listener, but also for the performer, to create a communal sense of timelessness inside a performance space. In solo work and in collaboration with dance and film he has been experimenting with field recording, analog electronics, aspects of performance art and often times combinations of all three.

More info at archiecarey.com

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Book of Omens CD release show this Friday!

This Friday at Art Share LA, Daniel Rosenboom will have a CD release show for his new album, Book of Omens.

Besides getting to hear the stellar ensemble featured on the recording (RosenboomVinny GoliaJake VosslerTim Lefebvre, and Matt Mayhall), the performance will feature the live video art of Kio Griffith.

This all ages show starts at 9 (doors at 8), and is $10.

For more info, check out the Facebook event.

Book of Omens is an album of programmatic instrumental music inspired by "an original shamanic myth about the cleansing and reforming of a corrupted universe." While sometimes channeling the likes of early Mahavishnu Orchestra, other times invoking Black Sabbath, and elsewhere recalling Ornette Coleman, the music ultimately takes the shape of something far beyond the sum of its influences.

Though you don't need to read the poem that inspired the album to enjoy the music, it can help add form to the shape of the album's narrativity. You can read it on Rosenboom's website, and follow along if you'd like. The album is out now on Nine Winds Records, and you can find it online on Amazon, Bandcamp, CDBaby, or iTunes.

Here's the address:
Art Share LA
801 E 4th Place
Los Angeles, CA 90013

And here is a promo video for the album, shot in the same location as many a cinematic masterpiece:

Notations 5: Lamb and Polansky

Better late than never, here is the fifth installment of Notations! Inspired by Cage's 1969 bookNotations is a collection of graphic scores, hand drawn music calligraphy, computer code, compositional sketches, text scores, and other innovative forms of musical notation.

Every Monday we'll showcase notation by two different composers, primarily focusing on those local to Los Angeles. This week's composers are Cat Lamb and Larry Polansky

All images used with permission, and copyright is retained by each image's respective creator. Click on the images to see a larger view.

line/shadow by Cat Lamb.
(view full score here)

Catherine Lamb (b. 1982, Olympia, WA., U.S.A.) is a composer/violist exploring sound through (mostly) intimate ensembles and solo work. She is interested in microscopic color variances in narrow bands, often with an ever-opening form. She is currently listening/ composing/ teaching/ playing/ working in Berlin

More info at sacredrealism.org/catlamb

Psaltery by Larry Polansky

Larry Polansky (b. 1954) is a composer, theorist, teacher, writer, performer, programmer, editor and publisher. He lives in Hanover, New Hampshire, is codirector and co-founder of Frog Peak Music, and teaches at Dartmouth College.

Sunday, July 7, 2013

REVIEW: LBO's Macbeth

photo by Keith Ian Polakoff

Long Beach Opera recently closed their 2013 season with a sold out production of Ernest Bloch's Macbeth. This US professional premiere of Bloch's only opera took place at the Port of Los Angeles in San Pedro. One of the LBO's unique draws is their creative venue selection. Not being tied down to a single venue allows them the option of presenting work at spots like the Aquarium of the Pacific, the Gallery Expo Center, or San Pedro's Warner Grand Theatre.

Inside the port's World Cruise Center, the stage was framed by two bleachers facing each other with a long wooden table inbetween. This table served as a multipurpose stage, representing the various rooms of Cawdor. The various incarnations of this table were facilitated by lighting designer Dan Weingarten's colorful palette. A chaparral-like thicket of chairs filled either end of this table, and they were also used to great narrative effect. The orchestra was almost completely hidden behind a black scrim on one end of the room,  as was the chorus.

While artistic and general director Andreas Mitisek's unconventional staging was engaging in and of itself, I would have liked to see more interaction with the unique aspects of the space. When LBO produced Gavin Bryar's The Paper Nautilus at the Aquarium of the Pacific, they incorporated the upper balcony, as well as the 30 foot tank behind the stage. At the port, the room seemed to function more as an anonymous black box. True, the long thin space suggested that particular stage layout, but it was one I could have imagined seeing at other venues, like Santa Monica's Highways. However, the ingenuity of prior productions suggests that this was due to factors like port security, being set in one of the busiest ports in the country, rather than any lack of creativity.

photo by Keith Ian Polakoff
During the performance, it became apparent that I have never seen an opera performance so near. There is almost always some sort of proscenium, pit, or other distance implying the fourth wall. This close proximity added an intriguing intimacy to the performance. Sitting right by to the singers, their voices didn't sound amplified, as they often do these days. Panamanian baritone Nmon Ford's rich voice filled the room as Macbeth, as did that of LBO regular Suzan Hanson, who played the role of Lady Macbeth.

One could hear that the score had moments of nuanced orchestration, though the details were blurred by distance, and a literal and acousmatic scrim. As an orchestral feature, this would have been unacceptable, but as accompaniment for an opera it was perfectly fitting. The exact same could be said of the chorus that occasionally sprouted out of the music.

Written between 1904 and 1909, Bloch's music felt like a time capsule from a fragile era, right before Stravinsky and/or Schoenberg rang in the de facto 20th century. Though the narrative parallels are inexact, it is worth considering Bloch's Macbeth as indicative of the musical, social, and political circumstances that charged these diametric musical factions, as well as the unrest that would consume Europe for the next 40 years. I wonder what could be said along similar lines of local LA composer Veronika Krausas' The Mortal Thoughts of Lady Macbeth?

LBO's 2014 season promises to be an interesting one, featuring Duke Ellington's Queenie Pie, John Adams' The Death of Klinghoffer, Stravinsky's Soldier Tale (adapted by Kurt Vonnegut) Wynton Marsalis' A Fiddler's Tale, and David Lang's The Difficulty of Crossing a Field.

Monday, July 1, 2013

Notations 4: Farmer and Winter

Here is the fourth installment of Notations! Inspired by Cage's 1969 bookNotations is a collection of graphic scores, hand drawn music calligraphy, computer code, compositional sketches, text scores, and other innovative forms of musical notation.

Every Monday we'll showcase notation by two different composers, primarily focusing on those local to Los Angeles. This week's composers are Patrick Farmer and Michael Winter.

All images used with permission, and copyright is retained by each image's respective creator. Click on the images to see a larger view.

a tree is as complicated as is a word by Patrick Farmer

Patrick Farmer is an artist working with improvisation, poetry, field recording, and composition. He is a founding member of the Set Ensemble, a group based in the UK dedicated to the performance of experimental music, especially that of the Wandelweiser group, and co-founded the online record label, Compost and Height, with Sarah Hughes in 2008. As of October 2012 patrick began studying towards his Ph.D at Oxford Brookes.

More info at patrickfarmer.org

field and perfect circuit by Michael Winter
(view full score here)

Michael Winter is a composer, curator, music theorist, and software designer. He co-founded and co-directs (with fellow composer eric km clark) the wulf., a non-profit arts organization that presents music free to the public in Los Angeles. Michael is a firm believer in music making as an experimental process and free information; e.g. open source code, free music, etc.

More info at unboundedpress.org